Model Products

Products summary

 

Here you can find a comprehensive list of NECCTON products.This includes selected high-level information, offering readers and product users an insightful overview of the data provided by NECCTON. Additionally, it provides identifiers for easy retrieval of both product and dataset specifications.

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Demersal fish biomass

Demersal fish biomass

The demersal fish are those species that spend a fraction of their lives in close association with the seabed, feeding primarily on bottom organisms. A typical example of a demersal fish is cod (Gadus morhua). Demersal fish are often an important target of fisheries in marine shelf ecosystems. Demersal fish act as couplers of pelagic and benthic energy pathways.

More details available in the Higher Trophic Level products report

Datasets ID: H8

Partners:

Technical University of Denmark

Region: Iberia-Biscay-Ireland

Iberia-Biscay-Ireland
Demersal fish biomass

Demersal fish biomass

The demersal fish are those species that spend a fraction of their lives in close association with the seabed, feeding primarily on bottom organisms. A typical example of a demersal fish is cod (Gadus morhua). Demersal fish are often an important target of fisheries in marine shelf ecosystems. Demersal fish act as couplers of pelagic and benthic energy pathways.

More details available in the Higher Trophic Level products report

Datasets ID: H7

Partners:

Technical University of Denmark

Region: North-West (NW) European Shelf

North-West (NW) European Shelf
Demersal fish biomass

Demersal fish biomass

The demersal fish are those species that spend a fraction of their lives in close association with the seabed, feeding primarily on bottom organisms. A typical example of a demersal fish is cod (Gadus morhua). Demersal fish are often an important target of fisheries in marine shelf ecosystems. Demersal fish act as couplers of pelagic and benthic energy pathways.

More details available in the Higher Trophic Level products report

Datasets ID: H9

Partners:

Technical University of Denmark

Region: Baltic Sea

Baltic Sea
Demersal fish biomass

Demersal fish biomass

The demersal fish are those species that spend a fraction of their lives in close association with the seabed, feeding primarily on bottom organisms. A typical example of a demersal fish is cod (Gadus morhua). Demersal fish are often an important target of fisheries in marine shelf ecosystems. Demersal fish act as couplers of pelagic and benthic energy pathways.

More details available in the Higher Trophic Level products report

Datasets ID: H10

Partners:

Technical University of Denmark

Region: Mediterranean Sea

Mediterranean Sea
Demersal fish biomass

Demersal fish biomass

The demersal fish are those species that spend a fraction of their lives in close association with the seabed, feeding primarily on bottom organisms. A typical example of a demersal fish is cod (Gadus morhua). Demersal fish are often an important target of fisheries in marine shelf ecosystems. Demersal fish act as couplers of pelagic and benthic energy pathways.

More details available in the Higher Trophic Level products report

Datasets ID: H22

Partners:

Technical University of Denmark

Region: Global

Global
Demersal fish biomass

Demersal fish biomass

The demersal fish are those species that spend a fraction of their lives in close association with the seabed, feeding primarily on bottom organisms. A typical example of a demersal fish is cod (Gadus morhua). Demersal fish are often an important target of fisheries in marine shelf ecosystems. Demersal fish act as couplers of pelagic and benthic energy pathways.

More details available in the Higher Trophic Level products report

Datasets ID: H22

Partners:

Technical University of Denmark

Region: Mediterranean Sea

Mediterranean Sea
Demersal fish biomass

Demersal fish biomass

The demersal fish are those species that spend a fraction of their lives in close association with the seabed, feeding primarily on bottom organisms. A typical example of a demersal fish is cod (Gadus morhua). Demersal fish are often an important target of fisheries in marine shelf ecosystems. Demersal fish act as couplers of pelagic and benthic energy pathways.

More details available in the Higher Trophic Level products report

Datasets ID: H21

Partners: Plymouth Marine Laboratory

Region: North-West (NW) European Shelf

North-West (NW) European Shelf
Benthic Flora

Benthic Flora

Benthic flora are essential elements in benthic-pelagic coupling and in carbon sequestration (blue carbon). Besides uptake of inorganic carbon and production of oxygen, the most important species of flora are habitat builders that often help stabilise sediment (e.g., seagrasses) and provide shelter, spawning, and nursery ground for multiple species, including some of commercial interest. Moreover, benthic flora typically supports high associated biodiversity.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H22

Partners: OGS

Region: Mediterranean Sea

Mediterranean Sea
Benthic Flora

Benthic Flora

Benthic flora are essential elements in benthic-pelagic coupling and in carbon sequestration (blue carbon). Besides uptake of inorganic carbon and production of oxygen, the most important species of flora are habitat builders that often help stabilise sediment (e.g., seagrasses) and provide shelter, spawning, and nursery ground for multiple species, including some of commercial interest. Moreover, benthic flora typically supports high associated biodiversity. 

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H40

Partners: NIOZ

Region: Black Sea

Black Sea
Carbon flux to the bottom

Carbon flux to the bottom

The flux of organic carbon to the bottom critically drives benthic ecosystems through the benthic food chain, diagenesis, and quantity of carbon sequestration through burial. The difficulty of in-situ determination greatly limits Information on carbon flow to the bottom at the ecosystem scale. Models can provide important information on carbon flux to the bottom at ecosystem scale and on its spatial and temporal variation.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H6

Partners: OGS

Region: Mediterranean Sea

Mediterranean Sea
Carbon flux to the bottom

Carbon flux to the bottom

The flux of organic carbon to the bottom critically drives benthic ecosystems through the benthic food chain, diagenesis, and quantity of carbon sequestration through burial. The difficulty of in-situ determination greatly limits Information on carbon flow to the bottom at the ecosystem scale. Models can provide important information on carbon flux to the bottom at ecosystem scale and on its spatial and temporal variation.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H3

Partners: UoL

Region: Black Sea

Black Sea
Carbon flux to the bottom

Carbon flux to the bottom

The flux of organic carbon to the bottom critically drives benthic ecosystems through the benthic food chain, diagenesis, and quantity of carbon sequestration through burial. The difficulty of in-situ determination greatly limits Information on carbon flow to the bottom at the ecosystem scale. Models can provide important information on carbon flux to the bottom at ecosystem scale and on its spatial and temporal variation.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H2

Partners: UKMO

Region: North-West (NW) European Shelf

North-West (NW) European Shelf
Carbon flux to the bottom

Carbon flux to the bottom

The flux of organic carbon to the bottom critically drives benthic ecosystems through the benthic food chain, diagenesis, and quantity of carbon sequestration through burial. The difficulty of in-situ determination greatly limits Information on carbon flow to the bottom at the ecosystem scale. Models can provide important information on carbon flux to the bottom at ecosystem scale and on its spatial and temporal variation.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H5

Partners: BSH

Region: Baltic Sea

Baltic Sea
Bottom Light

Bottom Light

Bottom light availability is an important environmental information in determining regions where marine flora; seaweeds, seagrasses and microphytobenthos; can develop. We will deliver the bottom light product as Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR), which includes radiation wavelengths between 400-700 nm.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H6

Partners: OGS

Region: Mediterranean Sea

Mediterranean Sea
Bottom Light

Bottom Light

Bottom light availability is an important environmental information in determining regions where marine flora; seaweeds, seagrasses and microphytobenthos; can develop. We will deliver the bottom light product as Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR), which includes radiation wavelengths between 400-700 nm.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H41

Partners: UoL

Region: Black Sea

Black Sea
Bottom Light

Bottom Light

Bottom light availability is an important environmental information in determining regions where marine flora; seaweeds, seagrasses and microphytobenthos; can develop. We will deliver the bottom light product as Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR), which includes radiation wavelengths between 400-700 nm.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H2

Partners: UKMO

Region: North-West (NW) European Shelf

North-West (NW) European Shelf
Bottom Light

Bottom Light

Bottom light availability is an important environmental information in determining regions where marine flora; seaweeds, seagrasses and microphytobenthos; can develop. We will deliver the bottom light product as Photosynthetic Active Radiation (PAR), which includes radiation wavelengths between 400-700 nm.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H5

Partners: BSH

Region: Baltic Sea

Baltic Sea
Macrozoobenthos

Macrozoobenthos

The macrozoobenthos, usually defined as benthic macrofauna larger than 1 mm in size, is an essential element in benthic-pelagic coupling, because it mediates particulate and solute fluxes between the water column and sediments. It degrades organic matter that sinks to the bottom, changes biogeochemical properties of sediments via bioturbation and bioirrigation, affecting, for instance, rates of microbial oxidation and denitrification. It also serves as a food source for higher trophic levels, thus helping to sustain fish and fisheries. Macrozoobenthic communities, in turn, respond to organic matter supplied from the water column, hydrodynamic regime, and temperature. Major feeding groups (suspension and deposit feeders) differ in diet composition and vertical habitat distribution, which defines their functioning. In turn, their environment and changes in its characteristics affect these groups differently.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H40

Partners: NIOZ

Region: Black Sea

Black Sea
Macrozoobenthos

Macrozoobenthos

The macrozoobenthos, usually defined as benthic macrofauna larger than 1 mm in size, is an essential element in benthic-pelagic coupling, because it mediates particulate and solute fluxes between the water column and sediments. It degrades organic matter that sinks to the bottom, changes biogeochemical properties of sediments via bioturbation and bioirrigation, affecting, for instance, rates of microbial oxidation and denitrification. It also serves as a food source for higher trophic levels, thus helping to sustain fish and fisheries. Macrozoobenthic communities, in turn, respond to organic matter supplied from the water column, hydrodynamic regime, and temperature. Major feeding groups (suspension and deposit feeders) differ in diet composition and vertical habitat distribution, which defines their functioning. In turn, their environment and changes in its characteristics affect these groups differently.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H2

Partners: UKMO/PML

Region: North-West (NW) European Shelf

North-West (NW) European Shelf
Macrozoobenthos

Macrozoobenthos

The macrozoobenthos, usually defined as benthic macrofauna larger than 1 mm in size, is an essential element in benthic-pelagic coupling, because it mediates particulate and solute fluxes between the water column and sediments. It degrades organic matter that sinks to the bottom, changes biogeochemical properties of sediments via bioturbation and bioirrigation, affecting, for instance, rates of microbial oxidation and denitrification. It also serves as a food source for higher trophic levels, thus helping to sustain fish and fisheries. Macrozoobenthic communities, in turn, respond to organic matter supplied from the water column, hydrodynamic regime, and temperature. Major feeding groups (suspension and deposit feeders) differ in diet composition and vertical habitat distribution, which defines their functioning. In turn, their environment and changes in its characteristics affect these groups differently.

More details available in the Benthic products report

Datasets ID: H40

Partners: NIOZ

Region: Black Sea

Black Sea
Marine mammal habitat

Marine mammal habitat

Understanding the distribution of marine mammals (MM) is essential to gain insights into their ecology and population dynamics, to implement conservation and management measures and assess their effectiveness, and to project the future of the ecosystem services and goods they provide (food provisioning, top-down control of the food web, carbon regulation, tourism, and leisure). The current Copernicus Marine Service does not include any products for large marine top predators such as marine mammals. This limitation prevents Copernicus Marine Service from providing stakeholders with products to assess the role of large marine top predators on the ecosystem. NECCTON will provide a new HTL model for marine mammals with the objective of providing new useful decision-tools to all stakeholders involved in the management or conservation of high trophic levels.

More details available in the Higher Trophic Level products report

Datasets ID: H12

Partners: The National Institute of Oceanography and Applied Geophysics

Region: Adriatic Sea

Adriatic Sea
Marine mammal habitat

Marine mammal habitat

Understanding the distribution of marine mammals (MM) is essential to gain insights into their ecology and population dynamics, to implement conservation and management measures and assess their effectiveness, and to project the future of the ecosystem services and goods they provide (food provisioning, top-down control of the food web, carbon regulation, tourism, and leisure). The current Copernicus Marine Service does not include any products for large marine top predators such as marine mammals. This limitation prevents Copernicus Marine Service from providing stakeholders with products to assess the role of large marine top predators on the ecosystem. NECCTON will provide a new HTL model for marine mammals with the objective of providing new useful decision-tools to all stakeholders involved in the management or conservation of high trophic levels.

More details available in the Higher Trophic Level products report

Datasets ID: H24

Partners: Instituto do Mar

Region: Azores

Azores
Mesozooplankton biomass

Mesozooplankton biomass

Mesozooplankton are heterotrophic organisms in the size range from 0.2 to 20 mm. Mesozooplankton move with ocean currents but can migrate vertically in the water column. Mesozooplankton generally feed on primary producers, microzooplankton and detritus particles. They are an important prey for fish larva and planktivorous fish and therefore represent an important link between primary producers and higher trophic levels.

More details available in the Pelagic lower trophic level products report

Datasets ID: H4

Partners: NERSC

Region: Arctic

Arctic
Mesozooplankton biomass

Mesozooplankton biomass

Mesozooplankton are heterotrophic organisms in the size range from 0.2 to 20 mm. Mesozooplankton move with ocean currents but can migrate vertically in the water column. Mesozooplankton generally feed on primary producers, microzooplankton and detritus particles. They are an important prey for fish larva and planktivorous fish and therefore represent an important link between primary producers and higher trophic levels.

More details available in the Pelagic lower trophic level products report

Datasets ID: H2

Partners: UKMO

Region: North-West (NW) European Shelf

North-West (NW) European Shelf
Mesozooplankton biomass

Mesozooplankton biomass

Mesozooplankton are heterotrophic organisms in the size range from 0.2 to 20 mm. Mesozooplankton move with ocean currents but can migrate vertically in the water column. Mesozooplankton generally feed on primary producers, microzooplankton and detritus particles. They are an important prey for fish larva and planktivorous fish and therefore represent an important link between primary producers and higher trophic levels.

More details available in the Pelagic lower trophic level products report

Datasets ID: H5

Partners: BSH

Region: Baltic Sea

Baltic Sea
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Want to learn more about the project?

NEWS AND PROJECT UPDATES

14 July 2024|News

Interactive ecosystem modelling workshop

NECCTON played a key role in the interactive ecosystem modelling training workshop held at Plymouth Marine Laboratory (PML) as a finale to the Advances in Marine Ecosystem Modelling Research (AMEMR) Symposium.

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11 July 2024|News

NECCTON at AMEMR 2024

Many researchers from the NECCTON project have actively participated in the AMEMR 2024 conference (Advances in Marine Ecosystem Modelling Research), sharing exciting results from the first year of our project. 

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24 April 2024|News

NECCTON at the Ocean Decade Conference 2024

The 2024 Ocean Decade Conference, held in Barcelona from April 10 to 12 and co-organized by UNESCO’s Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC/UNESCO), brought together over 1,500 participants from 124 countries and drew over 3,000 online viewers. Serving as the culmination of Ocean Decade Week with 120 Satellite Events (April 8-12), the conference's main outcome was the Barcelona Statement. This statement outlines priority...

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01 March 2024|News

NECCTON Project Endorsed by UN Ocean Decade Programme

NECCTON Project Endorsed by UN Ocean Decade Programme: Advancing Marine Biodiversity Conservation
The NECCTON is proud to announce its endorsement by the UN Ocean Decade Programme, as a project of the Marine Life 2030 programme, reconfirming its commitment to safeguarding the marine ecosystems. This endorsement signifies a significant milestone in NECCTON's mission to improve the monitoring and management of our...

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06 February 2024|News

NECCTON Releases Best Practices Guide for Model Development

NECCTON is dedicated to enhancing the Copernicus Marine Service, and this week announces the release of its concise guide for biogeochemical/ecological model development. This document outlines practical strategies for model implementation, fostering interoperability across CMEMS Monitoring and Forecasting Centres (MFCs). 

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17 January 2024|News

NECCTON new video

We are pleased to share with you our first project video. This short video introduces the wide range of activities and research developments that will be undertaken by the team, highlighting how they will be useful in support of Copernicus Marine Service and wider user community. 

Learn more
24 November 2023|News

Better models for ocean conservation: Horizon Europe guarantee

Through a Horizon Europe guarantee grant, the UK is continuing to provide improved monitoring of the marine ecosystem. 

Around the globe, there’s a growing awareness of the importance of the seas for all life on our planet. And if we are to protect the marine environment accurate monitoring and prediction of its behaviour is crucial, we cannot manage what we do not observe.

In Europe, the Copernicus Marine Service...

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30 October 2023|News

NECCTON's Latest: Reports on Advancements in Key Products

We're pleased to announce the release of a comprehensive series of reports that unveil the innovative products our project aims to develop across various key areas. At NECCTON, we're dedicated to pushing the boundaries of innovation, and these reports underscore our commitment to delivering advanced solutions.

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12 July 2023|News

NECCTON's first Virtual Science Meeting

NECCTON's first virtual science meeting was a great success. Providing an opportunity for the whole team to gather and share details of scientific advancements in the first six months of the project. 

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03 July 2023|News

NECCTON Co-Design Stakeholder Workshop

Last week, the NECCTON Stakeholder Workshop: Co-design of Future Products was held virtually. This two-day workshop took place on June 28th and 29th with the aim of presenting NECCTON's future products and gathering stakeholder needs. The first public event of NECCTON attracted over 100 participants, including key stakeholders, project scientists, and potential users of NECCTON products.

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28 June 2023|News

Advancing the Conservation of Ocean Biodiversity through Copernicus Marine Service Evolution

The New Copernicus Capability for Tropic Ocean Networks project (NECCTON) aims to expand the Copernicus Marine Service product catalogue by delivering new and improved biogeochemical products, by means of new models of higher trophic levels, the benthic habitat, and of marine pollution. Launched in January 2023, the project received funding under a Horizon Europe Call for the evolution of the Copernicus Marine Service and will run...

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